0%

Record, le magazine qui va à la rencontre des scènes musicales de niche.

25 janvier 2020
Record n°8 – Eng
Record n°8 – Eng

Lancé en 2016 et fabriqué entre Madrid, Melbourne et New York, Record Magazine s’intéresse aux scènes musicales peu explorées à travers de longues interviews et des séances photos dans les studios et intérieurs de djs, musiciens, producteurs…

10 Questions à Karl Henkell, fondateur de Record Magazine

Click here to read this interview in french 

  1. Can you quickly introduce yourself and your role in Record?

    Hi, my name is Karl Henkell, I’m the founder and editor-in-chief of Record Culture Magazine.

  2. Why did you want to create Record?

    While living in New York I saw the opportunity to do something that I felt would be exciting in print.
    I think newsstands can act as a window to many different worlds, and the niche music scenes I was following around the world weren’t really represented, though they were thriving in the real world and online.

    “The niche music scenes I was following around the world weren’t really represented, though they were thriving in the real world and online.”

  3. Can you tell us about your team and how do you all work together?

    Record is still a fairly small team that is between Melbourne, Madrid and New York, as well as a large network of freelance contributors around the world. Holly Canham is our Art Director and lives in Melbourne, Australia. Our Senior Editor Michael Kalenderian has just moved back to Melbourne from New York. My wife Hannah Canham is our merchandise designer, we have extra design help from Javi Bayo, all three of us are based in Madrid.
    We communicate via text, email, Whatsapp, Zoom, Google hangouts and are starting to try out Slack, we’re everywhere! Since the team is still quite small, it’s still in a fairly manageable “whatever works” phase.

  4. How did this issue come together?

    In much the same way as every issue, I make a wish list of people we’d like to interview and then creating the issue is a process of testing that with what’s possible. We work with many photographers and writers to make it all happen, as well as some illustrators.

  5. Why did you choose to make a printed magazine?

    I felt it was the only option really! I’ve loved print magazines since a young age, leafing through the likes of Mad magazine and Big Brother skateboard magazine as a teen. Up until starting the magazine I worked in online media, so that whole world had lost its shine to me. Also in terms of online, there were already many great websites occupying that space, so it didn’t feel necessary to add to the noise.

  6. There are a lot of music publications but Record has its own voice, was it your aim to differentiate yourself from other music magazines?

    My point of reference at the time were bookstore McNally Jackson and the newsstand Mulberry Iconic in downtown Manhattan, that stock a wide selection of magazines, but the music section there was oddly empty, other than titles like Rolling Stone and so on. So at that point it didn’t feel like there were other music magazines to differentiate from really.

    What was more influential were culture, fashion and literary titles really. I’ve always been attracted to magazines with a cultural slant, that have long form interviews. Since running the magazine I have come across other print magazines with a like-minded spirit, one that comes to mind being the Swiss music magazine Zweikommasieben. I’ve also always loved Audimat for its concept and striking design — I wish my French was better so I could enjoy the contents.

  7. Has the current health crisis changed anything in the way you work?

    It’s stopped me travelling, which until the pandemic started was a big part of creating the magazine. Where possible I would travel to meet people in person to hang out with them for a day or two to conduct the interview. That was a part of the enjoyment of creating the magazine, but we’ve been able to interview people over video calls, and still use local photographers to do their shoots. So the end product is much the same but I look forward to being able to meet with artists in person again.

    “I think magazines have an unusually strong ability to create communities around them. Physical products require physical spaces, and for people to interact with them. This whole chain reaction leads people to come into contact with one another, which is something that doesn’t really happen in the online world.”

  8. What is your take on independent magazines? What role do you think they play in the music culture?

    They certainly don’t play as big a role as they used to, if we think back to the ’80s — an era I was too young to properly experience — with the likes of The Face and i-D magazine which were hugely influential.

    I think magazines have an unusually strong ability to create communities around them. Physical products require physical spaces, and for people to interact with them. This whole chain reaction leads people to come into contact with one another, which is something that doesn’t really happen in the online world.

    A music magazine used to be where you discovered music, however now, like with all other magazines, their strength lies in going in-depth into a specific topic. I think print magazines are still extraordinarily good at telling a long story.

  9. Any future plans for Record?

    The first order of business is to keep on keeping on — to keep putting out new issues — as many people would be experiencing right now, it’s just a matter of getting through this pandemic time. Other than that we have many things we’d love to do, but we’re wary that timelines have to be kept fluid with the pandemic continuing.

    Something we’d love to do is a pop-up shop — we’ve been thinking about it for some time and are hoping it will be possible soon. In the last year we’ve started making more merchandise, and we dream of bringing all the elements of the Record world together in a shop— with in-store events and everything. 

  10. What are the magazines that inspired you the most in creating your own?

    The one’s I found particularly inspiring at the time were The Paris Review for its exceptional interviews and System for its impeccable design. It was no doubt also influenced by magazines that I love like Purple, Apartamento and 032c. In earlier times Acne Paper, Man About Town, and Big Brother all got me excited about print.

    I’m a bit of a magazine hoarder so there’s really no end to it!

     

    Commandez le numéro 8 de Record sur le Shop Cahier Central.
    Pour plus d’informations sur Record, rendez-vous sur record-magazine.com